Labor Statistics – 4th Quarter 2012 – Extended Mass Layoff Summary

EXTENDED MASS LAYOFFS — FOURTH QUARTER 2012
ANNUAL TOTALS — 2012

Employers in the private nonfarm sector initiated 1,674 mass layoff events in the fourth quarter of 2012 that resulted in the separation of 319,639 workers from their jobs for at least 31 days, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Over the year, total extended mass layoff events and associated worker separations were down from 1,903 and 334,383, respectively. (See table A.) Permanen worksite closures accounted for 7 percent of all events and 10 percentof all separations during the fourth quarter of 2012, primarily in the manufacturing sector. Fourth quarter 2012 layoff data are preliminary and are subject to revision. (See the Technical Note.) Preliminary fourth quarter 2012 data indicate that in New Jersey and New York, 31 extended mass layoff events related to Hurricane Sandy resulted in 6,759 worker separations.

Industry Distribution of Extended Layoffs

Construction industry firms reported 528 extended mass layoff events and 68,463 separations in the fourth quarter of 2012, largely due to the completion of seasonal work. This sector accounted for 32 percent of layoff events and 21 percent of related separations during the quarter. (See table 1.) During the same period, the manufacturing sector had 311 extended mass layoff events and 62,964 separations, also largely due to the completion of seasonal work. This sector accounted for 19 percent of layoff events and 20 percent of related separations during the quarter. Employers in the administrative and waste services sector reported 249 layoff events and 55,685 separations, primarily due to contract completion.

Table A. Selected measures of extended mass layoff activity

     Period                   Layoff events      Separations     Initial claimants

     2008                                             

January-March...........          1,340            230,098            259,292
April-June..............          1,756            354,713            339,630
July-September..........          1,581            290,453            304,340
October-December........          3,582            641,714            766,780

     2009     

January-March...........          3,979            705,141            835,551
April-June..............          3,395            651,318            731,049
July-September..........          2,034            345,531            406,823
October-December........          2,416            406,212            468,577

     2010

January-March...........          1,870            314,512            368,664
April-June..............          2,008            381,622            396,441
July-September..........          1,370            222,357            260,077
October-December........          1,999            338,643            390,584

     2011

January-March...........          1,490            225,456            258,220
April-June..............          1,810            317,546            342,530
July-September..........          1,393            235,325            291,066
October-December........          1,903            334,383            403,457

     2012

January-March(r) .......          1,294            246,956            291,174
April-June(r) ..........          1,959            385,983            383,466
July-September(r) ......          1,124            199,680            228,528
October-December(p) ....          1,674            319,639            273,975

    r = revised.
    p = preliminary.

 

Reasons for Extended Layoffs

Layoffs due to the completion of seasonal work accounted for 44 percent of extended mass layoff events and 39 percent of related separations in the private nonfarm sector during the fourth quarter of 2012. Business demand factors, primarily contract completion, accounted for 32 percent of both events and related separations during the quarter. (See table 2.)

Movement of Work

In the fourth quarter of 2012, 29 extended mass layoffs involved movement of work and were associated with 6,290 worker separations. Forty-one percent of the events related to movement of work were from manufacturing industries. Employers cited organizational changes as the economic reason for layoff in 34 percent of the events involving movement of work. Among the four census regions, the Northeast had the largest share of workers affected by the movement of work. (See tables 6-8.) The 29 events with movement of work for the fourth quarter involved 39 identifiable relocations of work actions. (See table 9.) Employers were able to provide information on the specific number of worker separations for 22 of these actions. Among these 22 actions, most were domestic reassignments and involved work moving within the same company. (See table 10.)

Table B. Metropolitan areas with the largest number of initial claimants associated with extended mass layoff events in the fourth quarter 2012, by residency of claimants

                                                      2011 IV (r)           2012 IV (p)

            Metropolitan area                      Initial                Initial
                                                  claimants     Rank     claimants    Rank

        Total, 372 metropolitan areas ...........  326,505                220,398

Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, Calif. ........   69,571        1        31,715      1
New York-Northern New Jersey-Long                          
    Island, N.Y.-N.J.-Pa. .......................   18,673        2        15,342      2
Chicago-Joliet-Naperville, Ill.-Ind.-Wis. .......   15,952        3        11,847      3
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, Calif. ........   13,493        4         9,554      4
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, Calif. ...........   11,376        5         7,812      5
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, Calif. ...........    7,539        6         5,434      6
Pittsburgh, Pa. .................................    3,490       14         4,209      7
Sacramento--Arden-Arcade--Roseville, Calif. .....    5,064        8         3,887      8
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, Calif. ..........    4,889        9         3,825      9
Las Vegas-Paradise, Nev. ........................    6,051        7         3,667     10

   r = revised.
   p = preliminary.
   NOTE: The geographic boundaries of the metropolitan areas shown in this table are definedin Office of Management and Budget Bulletin 10-02, December 1, 2009.

Recall Expectations

Sixty-three percent of the private nonfarm employers reporting an extended mass layoff in the fourth quarter of 2012 anticipated recalling at least some of the displaced workers. Of those employers expecting to recall workers, 37 percent indicated the offer would be extended to all displaced employees and 78 percent anticipated extending the offer to at least half of the workers. Among employers expecting to recall laid-off workers, 74 percent intend to do so within six months. Excluding extended mass layoff events due to seasonal work and vacation period, employers anticipated recalling the laid-off workers in 41 percent of the events. (See table 11.)

Size of Extended Layoffs

The average size of an extended mass layoff (as measured by the number of separations per layoff event) was 191 workers during the forth quarter of 2012. (See table 12.) Events were largely concentrated at the lower end of the extended layoff-size spectrum, with 64 percent involving fewer than 150 workers. Conversely, only 6 percent of layoff events involved 500 or more workers. (See table 13.)

Table C. Selected measures of mass layoff activity, 1996-2012

   Period                   Layoff events       Separations     Initial claimants

    1996 ................       4,760             948,122             805,810
    1997 ................       4,671             947,843             879,831
    1998 ................       4,859             991,245           1,056,462
    1999 ................       4,556             901,451             796,917
    2000 ................       4,591             915,962             846,267
    2001 ................       7,375           1,524,832           1,457,512
    2002 ................       6,337           1,272,331           1,218,143
    2003 ................       6,181           1,216,886           1,200,811
    2004 ................       5,010             993,909             903,079
    2005 ................       4,881             884,661             834,533

    2006 ................       4,885             935,969             951,155
    2007 ................       5,363             965,935             978,712
    2008 ................       8,259           1,516,978           1,670,042
    2009 ................      11,824           2,108,202           2,442,000
    2010 ................       7,247           1,257,134           1,415,766
    2011(r) .............       6,596           1,112,710           1,295,273
    2012(p) .............       6,051           1,152,258           1,177,143

   r = revised.	
   p = preliminary.

 

Initial Claimant Characteristics

A total of 273,975 initial claimants for unemployment insurance were associated with extended mass layoffs in the fourth quarter of 2012. Of these claimants, 12 percent were black, 22 percent were Hispanic, 29 percent were women, and 19 percent were 55 years of age or older. (See table 3.) In the entire civilian labor force for the same period, 12 percent of all persons were black, 16 percent were ispanic, 47 percent were women, and 21 percent were 55 years of age or older.

Geographic Distribution

Among the four census regions, the Midwest had the highest number of extended mass layoff events in the fourth quarter of 2012, primaily in the construction industry. Among the nine census divisions, the highest number of extended mass layoff events was in the Pacific. (See table 4.) California had the largest number of extended mass layoff events in the fourth quarter of 2012, followed by Illinois, New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio. (See table 5.) Excluding layoff activity due to seasonal work and vacation period reasons, California, New York, and Illinois had the largest numbers of events. Eighty percent of the initial claimants for unemployment insurance associated with extended mass layoff events in the fourth quarter of 2012 resided within metropolitan areas. Among the 372 metropolitan areas, Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, Calif., had the highest number of resident initial claimants. (See table B.)

Review of 2012

For all of 2012, employers reported 6,051 extended mass layoff actions, affecting 1,152,258 workers. Compared to 2011, the number of events decreased by 8 percent, while the number of separations increased by 4 percent. (See table C.) The annual proportion of extended mass layoff events involving permanent worksite closures, at 9 percent, increased for the first time since 2006. The annual average national unemployment rate decreased from 8.9 percent in 2011 to 8.1 percent in 2012, and private nonfarm payroll employment increased by 2.2 percent, or 2,410,000.

Industry Distribution of Extended Layoffs

In the private nonfarm economy, administrative and waste services firms reported the largest number of separations, increasing to the highest annual level since 2009. Manufacturing had the next highest number of separations, followed by construction.

Reasons for Extended

Layoffs Among the seven categories of economic reasons for layoff, layoffs due to business demand factors accounted for the largest number of extended mass layoff events during 2012, mostly due to contract completion. Layoffs attributed to this reason occurred primarily in construction and in administrative and waste services, which includes temporary help services. Movement of Work In 2012, 137 extended mass layoffs involved movement of work and were associated with 24,983 separated workers. Both measures reached program lows (with annual data available back to 2004). Forty-eight percent of events related to movement zof work were from manufacturing industries. Employers cited organizational issues in 49 percent of the layoffs involving the movement of work, the highest among the reason categories. The 137 extended layoff events with movement of work for 2012 involved 187 identifiable relocations of work actions. Employers were able to provide more complete separations information for 112 of the actions. Of these, 91 percent involved work moving within the same company, and 84 percent were domestic reassignments. Recall Expectations Fifty-seven percent of employers reporting an extended mass layoff in 2012 indicated they anticipated some type of recall, up slightly from 55 percent in 2011. Of those employers expecting to recall workers, 31 percent indicated that the offer would be extended to all displaced employees, and 65 percent intended to do so within 6 months. Excluding events due to seasonal work and vacation period, emloyers anticipated recalling laid-off workers in just 38 percent of the events.

Size of Extended Layoffs

In 2012, the average size of an extended mass layoff (as measured by separations per layoff event) was 190, the largest average size for a calendar year since 2006. Extended mass layoffs involving 500 or more workers accounted for 7 percent of events in 2012 but resulted in one-third of all separations.

Initial Claimant Characteristics

A total of 1,177,143 initial claimants for unemployment insurance were associated with extended mass layoffs in 2012. Of these claimants, 14 percent were black, 22 percent were Hispanic, 41 percent were women, and 20 percent were 55 years of age or older. Among persons in the civilian labor force for the same period, 12 percent were black, 16 percent were Hispanic, 47 percent were women, and 21 percent were 55 years of age or older.

Geographic Distribution

Among the four census regions, the West had the greatest numbers of laid-off workers in 2012, increasing by 22 percent to the highest annual level since 2009. Among the nine census divisions, the Pacific had the largest numbers of worker separations. Among the states, California had the largest annual numbers of laid-off workers. Among the 372 metropolitan areas, Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, Calif., had the highest number of resident initial claimants associated with extended mass layoff events in 2012, followed by New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, N.Y.-N.J.-Pa., and Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, Calif.

Note: The quarterly series on extended mass layoffs cover layoffs of at least 31-days duration that involve 50 or more individuals from a single employer filing initial claims for unemployment insurance during a consecutive 5-week period. Approximately 30 days after a mass layoff is triggered, the employer is contacted for additional information. Data for the current quarter are preliminary and subject to revision. This release also includes revised data for previous quarters. Data are not seasonally adjusted, but survey data suggest that there is a seasonal pattern to layoffs. Thus, comparisons betweenconsecutive quarters should not be used as an indicator of trend. For additional information about the program, see the Technical Note.

Industry Focus – Job Applications by Industry

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Retail Jobs – 2012 TOP 100 RETAILERS

2012 TOP 100 RETAILERS

A look at the top 100 Retailers and basic retail company information.  If you are looking for retail jobs, consider completing applications at some of the larger retailers.

Rank Company Headquarters Worldwide Retail Sales ($000) USA % of Worldwide Sales Stores
1 Wal-Mart Bentonville, Ark. $453,976,000 69.60% 4,423
2 Kroger Cincinnati $85,491,000 100.00% 3,574
3 Target Minneapolis $68,466,000 100.00% 1,763
4 Walgreen Deerfield, Ill. $68,233,000 97.20% 7,651
5 Costco Issaquah, Wash. $89,054,000 72.10% 425
6 The Home Depot Atlanta $70,391,000 88.20% 1,963
7 CVS Caremark Woonsocket, R.I. $59,786,000 99.80% 7,345
8 Lowe’s Mooresville, N.C. $50,207,000 98.20% 1,712
9 Best Buy Richfield, Minn. $50,705,000 74.10% 1,443
10 Safeway Pleasanton, Calif. $41,884,000 88.20% 1,453
11 McDonald’s Oak Brook, Ill. $85,941,000 39.80% 14,087
12 Sears Holdings Hoffman Estates, Ill. $39,365,000 86.00% 3,489
13 SUPERVALU Eden Prairie, Minn. $29,297,000 100.00% 2,466
14 Publix Lakeland, Fla. $26,967,000 100.00% 1,198
15 Amazon.com Seattle $47,715,000 55.30%
16 Macy’s Cincinnati $26,405,000 99.80% 840
17 Rite Aid Camp Hill, Pa. $25,256,000 100.00% 4,664
18 Ahold USA / Royal Ahold Washington, D.C. $63,066,000 39.80% 756
19 Delhaize America Salisbury, N.C. $29,400,000 65.40% 1,650
20 Kohl’s Menomonee Falls, Wis. $18,804,000 100.00% 1,127
21 Apple Stores / iTunes Cupertino, Calif. $18,418,000 96.80% 245
22 TJX Framingham, Mass. $23,267,000 74.70% 2,212
23 J.C. Penney Plano, Texas $17,238,000 99.50% 1,105
24 True Value Chicago $17,135,000 100.00% 4,650
25 YUM! Brands Louisville, Ky. $32,380,000 52.80% 18,050
26 H-E-B San Antonio $17,976,000 93.60% 308
27 Meijer Grand Rapids, Mich. $16,603,000 100.00% 197
28 Dollar General Goodlettsville, Tenn. $14,807,000 100.00% 9,937
29 Wakefern / ShopRite Keasbey, N.J. $12,838,000 100.00% 291
30 BJ’s Wholesale Club Westborough, Mass. $11,797,000 100.00% 196
31 Gap San Francisco, Calif. $14,289,000 80.10% 2,436
32 Subway Milford, Conn. $17,212,000 65.10% 25,014
33 Verizon Wireless Basking Ridge, N.J. $10,997,000 100.00% 2,330
34 Nordstrom Seattle $10,497,000 88.70% 225
35 7-Eleven Dallas $62,700,000 16.50% 7,779
36 Staples Framingham, Mass. $20,615,000 50.10% 1,583
37 Whole Foods Market Austin, Texas $10,108,000 96.90% 311
38 Ace Hardware Oak Brook, Ill. $10,250,000 92.60% 4,072
39 Bed Bath & Beyond Union, N.J. $9,511,000 98.80% 1,143
40 Aldi Batavia, Ill. $42,871,000 21.50% 1,195
41 Wendy’s Dublin, Ohio $9,604,000 93.00% 5,876
42 Ross Stores Pleasanton, Calif. $8,613,000 99.90% 1,124
43 Limited Brands Columbus, Ohio $10,364,000 82.90% 2,623
44 Family Dollar Matthews, N.C. $8,548,000 100.00% 7,023
45 Burger King Holdings Miami $15,499,000 54.50% 7,218
46 Toys “R” Us Wayne, N.J. $17,363,000 47.70% 871
47 Army Air Force Exchange Dallas $8,228,000 100.00% 181
48 Menard Eau Claire, Wis. $8,067,000 100.00% 262
49 Starbucks Seattle $11,700,000 68.70% 10,787
50 Darden Restaurants Orlando $8,108,000 97.50% 1,936
51 Trader Joe’s Monrovia, Calif. $32,691,000 22.40% 376
52 Office Depot Boca Raton, Fla. $16,711,000 44.70% 1,125
53 Barnes & Noble New York $7,157,000 100.00% 1,330
54 Hy-Vee W. Des Moines, Iowa $7,092,000 100.00% 261
55 Winn-Dixie Stores Jacksonville, Fla. $6,986,000 100.00% 484
56 Health Mart Systems Omaha, Neb. $6,943,000 100.00% 2,850
57 A&P Montvale, N.J. $6,791,000 100.00% 310
58 Giant Eagle O’Hara Township, Pa. $6,681,000 100.00% 406
59 GameStop Grapevine, Texas $9,551,000 68.80% 4,455
60 Dollar Tree Chesapeake, Va. $6,631,000 98.50% 4,252
61 AutoZone Memphis $6,871,000 94.90% 4,507
62 AT&T Wireless Dallas $6,486,000 100.00% 2,300
63 Dunkin’ Brands Canton, Mass. $8,343,000 77.00% 9,472
64 DineEquity Glendale, Calif. $6,550,000 96.50% 3,385
65 Wegman’s Food Markets Rochester, N.Y. $6,199,000 100.00% 78
66 Dillard’s Little Rock, Ark. $6,194,000 100.00% 304
67 Advance Auto Parts Roanoke, Va. $6,163,000 99.30% 3,636
68 O’Reilly Automotive Springfield, Mo. $5,789,000 100.00% 3,740
69 OfficeMax Naperville, Ill. $7,121,000 77.60% 881
70 QVC West Chester, Pa. $8,268,000 65.50% 0
71 Dick’s Sporting Goods Coraopolis, Pa. $5,212,000 100.00% 561
72 PetSmart Phoenix, Ariz. $5,402,000 96.00% 1,159
73 Big Lots Columbus, Ohio $5,233,000 97.30% 1,451
74 Defense Commissary Agcy. Fort Lee, Va. $5,067,000 100.00% 180
75 Save Mart Modesto, Calif. $5,036,000 100.00% 238
76 Alimentation Couche-Tard Tempe, Ariz. $6,863,000 70.90% 4,050
77 Dell Round Rock, Texas $4,748,000 100.00% 0
78 WinCo Foods Boise, Idaho $4,563,000 100.00% 80
79 Sherwin-Williams Cleveland $4,707,000 96.20% 3,326
80 Harris Teeter Supermkts. Charlotte, N.C. $4,286,000 100.00% 204
81 Tractor Supply Co. Brentwood, Tenn. $4,233,000 100.00% 1,085
82 Albertsons Boise, Idaho $4,100,000 100.00% 211
83 Chick-fil-A Atlanta $4,051,000 100.00% 1,615
84 Brinker International Dallas $4,447,000 90.80% 1,335
85 Neiman Marcus Dallas $4,035,000 100.00% 77
86 Foot Locker New York $5,623,000 70.40% 2,476
87 RadioShack Fort Worth, Texas $4,186,000 94.60% 5,480
88 Burlington Coat Factory Burlington, N.J. $3,854,000 99.60% 477
89 Roundy’s Supermarkets Milwaukee, Wis. $3,827,000 100.00% 158
90 Michaels Stores Irving, Texas $4,210,000 90.90% 1,109
91 Belk Charlotte, N.C. $3,700,000 100.00% 303
92 Stater Bros. Holdings San Bernardino, Calif. $3,693,000 100.00% 167
93 Sonic Oklahoma City, Okla. $3,693,000 100.00% 3,561
94 Williams-Sonoma San Francisco $3,742,000 98.40% 561
95 IKEA North America Conshohocken, Pa. $36,943,000 9.80% 38
96 Price Chopper Supermkts. Rotterdam, N.Y. $3,556,000 100.00% 129
97 The Sports Authority Englewood, Colo. $3,471,000 100.00% 460
98 OSI Restaurant Partners Tampa, Fla. $3,803,000 91.00% 1,248
99 Ingles Markets Asheville, N.C. $3,429,000 100.00% 203
100 Raley’s W. Sacramento, Calif. $3,335,000 100.00% 142