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State Employment And Unemployment Report - April 2013

Regional And State Employment And Unemployment Report April 2013

Regional and State Employment And Unemployment Report rates were generally little changed in April. Forty states and the District of Columbia had unemployment rate decreases, three states had increases, and seven states had no change, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Forty-three states and the District of Columbia had unemployment rate decreases from a year earlier, while seven states had increases. The national jobless rate was little changed in April, at 7.5 percent, but was 0.6 percentage point lower than a year earlier.

In April, nonfarm payroll employment increased in 30 states, decreased in 18 states and the District of Columbia, and was unchanged in 2 states.  The largest over-the-month increases in employment occurred in Texas (+33,100), New York (+25,300), and Florida (+17,000). The largest over-the-month decrease in employment occurred in Wisconsin (-24,100), followed by Minnesota (-11,400). Colorado, Hawaii, Missouri, and Nevada had the largest over-the-month percentage increases in employment (+0.5 percent each). Wisconsin (-0.9 percent) and Minnesota (-0.4 percent) had the largest over-the-month percentage declines in employment. Over the year, nonfarm employment increased in 47 states and the District of Columbia and decreased in 3 states. The largest over-the-year percentage increases occurred in North Dakota (+3.7 percent) and Utah (+3.5 percent). The largest over-the-year percentage decreases in employment occurred in
Wyoming (-0.5 percent) and Maine (-0.3 percent).

Regional Unemployment (Seasonally Adjusted)

In April, the West continued to have the highest regional unemployment rate, 8.0 percent, while the South again had the lowest rate, 7.1 percent. Over the month, three regions had statistically ignificant unemployment rate changes: the Northeast and West (-0.3 percentage point each) and the South (-0.1 point). Significant over-the-year rate changes occurred in the same three regions: the West (-1.4 percentage points), South (-0.7 point), and Northeast (-0.5 point). (See table 1.)

Among the nine geographic divisions, the Pacific continued to have the highest jobless rate, 8.5 percent in April. The West North Central again had the lowest rate, 5.4 percent. Three divisions had statistically significant over-the-month unemployment rate changes: the Middle Atlantic (-0.4 percentage point), Pacific (-0.3 point), and South Atlantic (-0.2 point). Three divisions had significant rate changes from a year earlier: the Pacific (-1.6 percentage points) and the Mountain and South Atlantic (-0.9 point each).

State Unemployment (Seasonally Adjusted)

Nevada had the highest unemployment rate among the states in April, 9.6 percent. The next highest rates were in Illinois (9.3 percent), Mississippi (9.1 percent), and California (9.0 percent). North Dakota again had the lowest jobless rate, 3.3 percent. In total, 19 states had jobless rates significantly lower than the U.S. figure of 7.5 percent, 8 states and the District of Columbia had measurably higher rates, and 23 states had rates that were not appreciably different from that of the nation. (See tables A and 3.)

Fifteen states had statistically significant over-the-month unemployment rate changes in April, all of which were declines. The largest of these occurred in California, New York, and South Carolina (-0.4 percentage point each). The remaining 35 states and the District of Columbia had jobless rates that were not measurably different from those of a month earlier, though some had changes that were at least as large numerically as the significant changes. (See table B.)

The largest jobless rate declines from April 2012 occurred in Nevada (-1.9 percentage points), Rhode Island (-1.8 points), and California and Florida (-1.7 points each). Eleven additional states had maller but also statistically significant decreases over the year. The remaining 35 states and the District of Columbia had unemployment rates that were not appreciably different from those of a year earlier. (See table C.)

Nonfarm Payroll Employment (Seasonally Adjusted)

In April 2013, nine states had statistically significant over-the-month changes in employment, seven of which were increases. The largest statistically significant job gains occurred in Texas (+33,100) and New York (+25,300). The two statistically significant job decreases occurred in Wisconsin (-24,100) and Minnesota (-11,400). (See table D.)

Over the year, 28 states had statistically significant changes in employment, all of which were positive. The largest over-the-year job increase occurred in Texas (+326,100), followed by California (+273,100), Florida (+119,100), and New York (+111,600). (See table E.)

Table A. States with unemployment rates significantly different
from that of the U.S., April 2013, seasonally adjusted
————————————————————–
                State                           Rate(p)
————————————————————–
United States (1) ……………. 7.5
Alaska ………………………… 6
California …………………….. 9
District of Columbia ……………. 8.5
Hawaii ………………………… 4.9
Idaho …………………………. 6.1
Illinois ………………………. 9.3
Indiana ……………………….. 8.5
Iowa ………………………….. 4.7
Kansas ………………………… 5.5
Maryland ………………………. 6.5
Massachusetts ………………….. 6.4
Minnesota ……………………… 5.3
Mississippi ……………………. 9.1
Montana ……………………….. 5.5
Nebraska ………………………. 3.7
Nevada ………………………… 9.6
New Hampshire ………………….. 5.5
New Jersey …………………….. 8.7
North Carolina …………………. 8.9
North Dakota …………………… 3.3
Oklahoma ………………………. 4.9
Rhode Island …………………… 8.8
South Dakota …………………… 4.1
Texas …………………………. 6.4
Utah ………………………….. 4.7
Vermont ……………………….. 4
Virginia ………………………. 5.2
Wyoming ……………………….. 4.8
————————————————————–
   1 Data are not preliminary.
   p = preliminary.

 

Table B. States with statistically significant unemployment rate changes  
from March 2013 to April 2013, seasonally adjusted    
————————————————————————-  
                                           Rate             
                                 ———– ———–  Over-the-month
             State                  March       April        change(p)
                                 2013   2013(p)    
————————————————————————-
California ………………… 9.4 9 -0.4
Florida …………………… 7.5 7.2 -0.3
Georgia …………………… 8.4 8.2 -0.2
Hawaii ……………………. 5.1 4.9 -0.2
Iowa ……………………… 4.9 4.7 -0.2
Maine …………………….. 7.1 6.9 -0.2
New Hampshire ……………… 5.7 5.5 -0.2
New Jersey ………………… 9 8.7 -0.3
New York ………………….. 8.2 7.8 -0.4
North Carolina …………….. 9.2 8.9 -0.3
Pennsylvania ………………. 7.9 7.6 -0.3
Rhode Island ………………. 9.1 8.8 -0.3
South Carolina …………….. 8.4 8 -0.4
Utah ……………………… 4.9 4.7 -0.2
Washington ………………… 7.3 7 -0.3
————————————————————————-
   p = preliminary.
Table C. States with statistically significant unemployment rate changes  
from April 2012 to April 2013, seasonally adjusted    
————————————————————————-  
                                           Rate             
                                 ———————–   Over-the-year  
             State                  April       April        change(p)
                                 2012   2013(p)    
————————————————————————-
Alaska ……………………. 7 6 -1
California ………………… 10.7 9 -1.7
Colorado ………………….. 8.2 6.9 -1.3
Florida …………………… 8.9 7.2 -1.7
Georgia …………………… 9.1 8.2 -0.9
Hawaii ……………………. 6.1 4.9 -1.2
Idaho …………………….. 7.3 6.1 -1.2
Nevada ……………………. 11.5 9.6 -1.9
New York ………………….. 8.6 7.8 -0.8
Rhode Island ………………. 10.6 8.8 -1.8
South Carolina …………….. 9.3 8 -1.3
Utah ……………………… 5.7 4.7 -1
Vermont …………………… 4.9 4 -0.9
Virginia ………………….. 5.9 5.2 -0.7
Washington ………………… 8.4 7 -1.4
————————————————————————-
   p = preliminary.
Table D. States with statistically significant employment changes from  
March 2013 to April 2013, seasonally adjusted    
————————————————————————–  
                                   March         April      Over-the-month
           State               2013    2013(p)        change(p)
————————————————————————–
Colorado…………………. 2,351,100 2,362,700 11,600
Connecticut………………. 1,643,000 1,649,300 6,300
Hawaii…………………… 609,600 612,600 3,000
Minnesota………………… 2,772,000 2,760,600 -11,400
Missouri…………………. 2,680,400 2,692,500 12,100
New York…………………. 8,879,400 8,904,700 25,300
Texas……………………. 11,112,900 11,146,000 33,100
Virginia…………………. 3,753,800 3,765,900 12,100
Wisconsin………………… 2,805,800 2,781,700 -24,100
————————————————————————–
   p = preliminary.
Table E. States with statistically significant employment changes from  
April 2012 to April 2013, seasonally adjusted    
————————————————————————–  
                                    April        April      Over-the-year
           State               2012    2013(p)       change(p)
————————————————————————–
Arizona………………….. 2,454,200 2,494,800 40,600
California……………….. 14,329,100 14,602,200 273,100
Colorado…………………. 2,299,500 2,362,700 63,200
Delaware…………………. 417,900 424,400 6,500
Florida………………….. 7,396,300 7,515,400 119,100
Georgia………………….. 3,948,700 4,016,800 68,100
Idaho……………………. 619,500 634,900 15,400
Illinois…………………. 5,735,200 5,775,500 40,300
Indiana………………….. 2,894,200 2,928,300 34,100
Maryland…………………. 2,568,300 2,602,900 34,600
Massachusetts…………….. 3,265,800 3,312,000 46,200
Michigan…………………. 4,024,500 4,056,800 32,300
Mississippi………………. 1,102,400 1,119,300 16,900
Missouri…………………. 2,664,700 2,692,500 27,800
Nevada…………………… 1,139,200 1,161,900 22,700
New Jersey……………….. 3,881,200 3,950,300 69,100
New York…………………. 8,793,100 8,904,700 111,600
North Carolina……………. 3,981,300 4,054,600 73,300
North Dakota……………… 425,300 441,200 15,900
Oklahoma…………………. 1,605,900 1,624,800 18,900
Oregon…………………… 1,636,400 1,660,800 24,400
South Carolina……………. 1,857,700 1,881,500 23,800
Tennessee………………… 2,709,400 2,757,300 47,900
Texas……………………. 10,819,900 11,146,000 326,100
Utah…………………….. 1,242,400 1,286,100 43,700
Vermont………………….. 301,200 306,300 5,100
Virginia…………………. 3,729,200 3,765,900 36,700
Washington……………….. 2,860,600 2,917,200 56,600
————————————————————————–
   p = preliminary.

 

 

 

 

 

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Interview Questions and How to Prepare for an Interview

Common Interview Questions

The interview process can be very stressful, but if you take some time and prepare yourself, you can be in a great position to land the job.  Make sure you familiar with common interview question for the type of job you are applying.  This will take some time and research, but will payoff in the end.

10 common interview questions you should be ready to answer:

  1. Tell me about yourself. – This is your time to show off, feel free to list off major work accomplishments, personal interests and all the things that make you special.
  2. What interests you about this opening? (Or why do you want to work for us?) – Think about why you are exploring a new job.
  3. What do you know about our company so far? – Make sure you do some basic research before the interview.  The job market is tough and employers are looking for candidates interested in being on the team.
  4. Why did you leave your last job? (Or why are you thinking about leaving your current job?) – Be careful not to trash your last company, instead consider relating the questions to your personal growth.
  5. Tell me about your experience at ___. (Fill in past job.) – Make sure you can answer how spent your time.  Also, try to list additional projects you took on when you were not busy.
  6. What experience do you have doing ____? (Fill in each of the major responsibilities of the job.) – Review the job posting when you apply and before the interview.  Make sure you can answer each of the job responsibility areas.
  7. Tell me about your strengths. – This is another question where you can list off accomplishments and personal traits that you will bring to the company.
  8. Tell me about a time when… (Fill in with situations relevant to the position. For instance: Tell me about when you had to take initiative … you had to deal with a difficult customer … you had to respond to a crisis … you had to give difficult feedback to an employee) – Be prepared ahead of time with a clear examples for these types of questions.  You don’t want to be struggling in the interview to answer these.
  9. What salary range are you looking for?   – Salary discussions usually come toward the end of the interview process, when the company already wants you and understands your value—when you have more leverage. Salary ranges tend to be more flexible once the employer knows you’re the perfect candidate. Few hiring managers will let their perfect candidate get away because of a small gap in salary range.  Do your research and be ready with a number that fits your needs.
  10. What questions do you have for me?  – Be prepared with several questions for the interviewer   This is your chance to ask about culture, promotion or any outstanding benefit questions.